EVEN NEW YORKERS ARE FIGHTING PROP. 8 – A BRUNCH TALE

by Miss Bliss

“It shocked me when I learned Prop. 8 had passed,” says a woman named Helen with long hair and kind eyes.  “I thought when Obama won, Prop. 8 would fail.”

“A lot of people did,” I say.  It is a quiet and cold November afternoon in Manhattan, and six bisexual women have come together to brunch, converse and meet new friends.

“I heard it was the black and Latino voters who voted for Obama and against gay rights,” says a pretty girl with long dark hair.

“Actually, that isn’t entirely correct,” I say.  “I heard on NPR that it was actually age that decided if you would vote for or against the proposition.  Older conservative folks – regardless of race – were the main supporters of the prop.  Oh, and don’t forget all the money the Mormon Church poured into California to make this happen.”

“One thing that made me feel better is that the prop. barely passed this time,” says Helen.  “The last time California passed it – before the State Supreme Court overturned it – it was a huge margin.  Something like 20% more people voted for it than against it.  So to have it only pass by 4 points just a few years later is progress.”

“One of the great things to come out of this,” says a foxy Asian girl wrapped in a stripped blue scarf, “are the protests.  This time the LGBT community is really fighting back.  As I said before, I am a lawyer and I was lucky enough to sit in on a national conversation between LGBT lawyers working to overturn these unconstitutional propositions.  I personally don’t think Prop. 8 will stay on the books long.”

“It is not a ‘special rights’ issue; gay marriage is a civil right,” says Helen.  “And, as someone who was around during the Civil Rights movement–” she winks and the girls laugh– “it is truly exciting to see us getting closer to having equal rights.”

As the conversation switches topics, I am pleased to know that the passing of Prop. 8 has initiated a national call to arms.  Overturning this discriminatory proposition is not just California’s burden;  LGBT supporters from all around the country and even the world are joining local and online protests.

The good news is according to the San Francisco Chronicle, the California State Supreme Court decided on November 19, 2008 that they will review the ballot measure to decide its legality.   Justices will turn in written arguments on January 15, 2009 and a hearing could be held as early as March.  Unfortunately, the justices will not allow gay marriages to continue in the interim.

How can you help?  I encourage you to visit Join The Impact – 1 Million Plus for Equality!  This group is organizing local and online protests and can help make your voice heard.  They organized this week’s “Day Without a Gay” protest where LGBT folks were encouraged to stay home and not spend their money to demonstrate the economic power of the community.  Know about any local protests happening?  Please comment here.

XOXOOXXO
BLISS WARRIOR
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IF YOU ENJOYED READING THIS POST, YOU MAY ENJOY READING:
SIGN A PETITION TO REOPEN PROPOSITION 8 FOR CALIFORNIA
ON TUESDAY, VOTE FOR EQUALITY
HAPPY BISEXUAL AWARENESS DAY!

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